Parsing the Fourth Amendment

My comments on this news:

Encroachments on Liberty come in various guises.  Reading the news article below, one is disappointed in Gov. Jerry "Moonbeam" Brown for failing to protect a component of Liberty when the opportunity arose.  

Privacy of papers and cell phone contents is surely one aspect of Liberty. Why, in some States, are police authorised to search these without a warrant during a traffic stop? Is it because the technology exists to "grab" the contents of your phone and, therefore, the answer is that they do it because they can?
 
If the "penumbra" of privacy guarantees in the Constitution protects the right to choose an abortion, as per Roe v. Wade for example, do not privacy rights extend to protecting one's information from a warrantless search?
 
In every issue, however, one might distinguish between the federal right to trample on Liberty --- forbidden in the Bill of Rights and Constitution -- and the State's right to do exactly the same. The relatively-recently-invented "incorporation doctrine" extends Bill of Rights prohibitions [the "Congress shall not" clauses] to State government. The "incorporation clause" forbids States, as well as the federal government, from trampling on Liberty.
 
A fair reading of the Bill of Rights' original intent, however, is that it prevents only the federal government from growing in power and intrusiveness. So maybe Governor Brown is within his constitutional right as regards California. If so, then California and any other State can make its own law in any number of areas, including abortion and exercise of religion. 
 
A great deal follows from debate of this search issue.
V.
................................................................................................